KENTUNA

In Watamu, a lush section of the vast Kenyan coast, Bryan Matiba and his team, work hand in hand with local fisherman to source the freshest fish and seafood on the market. With a vision to drastically improve the quality and accessibility of seafood to customers country wide, Bryan set up Kentuna. 

About the Founder

Bryan Matiba spent all of his childhood on the Kenyan coast. With a father passionate about sport fishing, Bryan grew up fishing the coastline and spent his school holidays working as part of the crew on large fishing boats. Moving to the UK to study Yacht Design and Engineering at Southampton university and then traveling to beautiful places like Cape Verde to gain more experience, he finally settling back In Watamu. It was on a fishing trip up in Lamu, when Bryan and a friend caught a large Tuna that gave him the light bulb moment that jump started his idea for Kentuna.  It was when filleting this beautiful Tuna, amazed by the quality and size of the fish, that Bryan had a moment of realization. How was he now meant to get this delicious fish from a remote place like Lamu to the people who appreciated and wanted it? Kentuna was born! 

Sourcing their seafood  

Bryan has grown up surrounded by local fishermen who catch kilos of fish on a daily basis but again like him, struggle to get their fish to a suitable market. Demand was high and so was supply but a decent cold chain was lacking, as a result seafood prices declined majorly, and these talented fishermen struggled to make an income. 

Now Kentuna have a fleet of local fishermen who fish out of Watamu using a rod, reel and line (a sustainable and commercial form of sport fishing Bryan describes it as). Fresh fish are bought up to the Kentuna team daily who clean, fillet and blast freeze it to retain its freshness and quality. 

Sustainable seafood 

With Bryans extensive fishing knowledge and passion for the sea, fishing sustainably is intrinsic to the Kentuna business. Appreciating that seafood is seasonal and so only harvesting specific seafood at particular times of year, helps to maintain and support populations. This long-term way of thinking is also captured in the training that Kentuna provide for their fishermen. Teaching fisherman how to humanly and correctly kill their catch in order to preserve its quality is done by their filleting team who take them through the consumer quality points when preparing the seafood for packaging. Correct storing of seafood on ice in cold boxes whilst out fishing all day is also taught so to ensure health and safety for consumers. Finally, incentivizing fisherman with fair prices based off size and quality rather than quantity means that populations are preserved, and top-quality seafood is bought in daily.